THE INTEL ON SPORT

20 May 2015 Comments 0

Earlier this month we teamed up with an online publication for which I’ve had growing respect over a number of years – SportingIntelligence.com.

What drew me to it are its independence, insights and level and quality of analysis.

No disrespect to journalists and reporters in the ‘big’ media houses but independence in reporting is more a relic of the past rather than the norm today. Having said that, the British sports media is, in my experience, far more likely to maintain their right and responsibility for fearless reporting than in other parts of the world.

The pressures in today’s fast-moving media world to cross-promote, not report, ‘go soft’ and/or find a populist, generally celebrity-driven angle is intense and can be difficult for professional journalists who are often required to compromise. It’s even more challenging if journalists are part of a multi-platform media conglomerate, or they have a powerful owner with strong views.

In my home country of Australia, for example, there is one billionaire head of a major sport who, legend has it, is known to call-up his friend, another Australian billionaire who owns a media empire, and ask him to remove a news item if he doesn’t like it. It happens. And when the same sport billionaire is unhappy with a report in a rival publication, he reportedly calls them up and threatens to withdraw all advertising related to his business. With that level of influence – and it’s not an isolated case – sports journalists often have little choice but to become PR operatives.

While an online publication like SportingIntelligence.com has a degree of freedom that some other media publications do not, there are nonetheless mouths to feed, rent to pay or a mortgage to meet.

SKINS has partnered with SportingIntelligence.com because we see it as a good fit for what we love about sport and what we stand for. If you’re anything like me it’s not only what happens on the field of play but also what drives a sport off it. Off the field generates more interest today than ever, I guess because the business of sport continues to grow at an amazing pace.

In SportingIntelligence.com, we see a kindred spirit. You’ll be informed. You’ll get insights and analysis you won’t get in too many other places. And you’ll get the tough questions answered.

That’s why we’re delighted to partner with them for the next 12 months. Our support in is two parts.

First, it takes the form of being a partner of their annual review of sports salaries, one of the most outstanding yearly sports publications you’ll see. Seriously. It includes a league-by-league analysis of salaries, the credentials of 25 ‘Super Clubs’, a look at the footballers playing in Europe’s Big 5 leagues and the ‘origin’ of the men working in the United States’ Big 4 sports by state, college or country. Even AFL gets a thorough looking at. It’s a fantastic publication that’s not to be missed. Click here to read more 

Second – and I’m really excited by this – it’s about giving a leg-up to the future of sports journalism by helping aspiring young sports investigative journalists. It might be something relatively small – such as help with a train ticket – or something bigger, such as affording an FOI request or travelling somewhere for a few days to do some research for a big story. The idea is not to make one young journo rich, but to help a group of writers cover subjects they might not otherwise be able to do as well as receive some mentoring from the experienced expert contributors involved with SportingIntelligence.com. Click here learn more 

Take a look and make it one of your ‘go to’ sport publications. http://www.sportingintelligence.com/